Yellowtail Flounder

Yellowtail Flounder

Yellowtail Flounder

The Yellowtail Flounder is a member of a much larger family of left or right-eyed flatfish including Turbot, Halibut, Plaice, Sole, Dab, Flounder and many other varieties. At birth they resemble a more standard fish with a swim bladder and migrate from the breeding grounds as plankton. They soon develop a more rounded shape but do not live on the ocean floor, eventually one eye moves around to join the other eye, the fish loses its swim bladder and sinks to the bottom laying on its blind side.

This week’s offering from NH Community Seafood was 25 (2 pounds) deftly filleted Yellowtail Flounders.

Yellowtail Flounder from NH Community Seafood

Yellowtail Flounder from NH Community Seafood

At just over an ounce each and thinner than packing cardboard, I approach the idea of cooking them with some trepidation. I was planning a meal for 5 and the thought of sautéing or frying seemed like it would take too long even though each would barely be on the heat for more that a minute. In the end I decided to baste them with a Dijon-Thyme sauce and broil for 1 minute.

Yellowtail Flounder sauced and ready for the oven

Yellowtail Flounder sauced and ready for the oven

I laid the fillets out on two prepared cookie sheets and then lightly brushed on the Dijon sauce/paste before popping them in the oven. After a minute I decided that an additional 45 seconds was better. Perhaps they could have gone another 15 to 25 seconds to help the sauce brown up a little more but I didn’t want to over cook them so I plated the Yellowtails and broiled the second batch for 1 minute 45 seconds.

Broiled Yellowtail Flounder with a Dijon-Thyme sauce

Broiled Yellowtail Flounder with a Dijon-Thyme sauce

Once finished plating they immediately hit the table along with basmati rice and grill peppers and onions. The fish was superb; tender, moist, and tasty. I would use the sauce on any flatfish or even smaller pollock or cod. I will definitely opt for the Yellowtails again if they reappear.

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