American Pollock

Jordan and Evermann, 1896-1900, p.2534 Figure 98. - American pollock (Pollachius virens), Eastport, Maine From Goode. Drawing by H. L. Todd

Jordan and Evermann, 1896-1900, p.2534
Figure 98. – American pollock (Pollachius virens), Eastport, Maine From Goode. Drawing by H. L. Todd

Last Friday’s NH Community Seafood selection was American Pollock. Also known as saithe, coley, Boston bluefish, Pacific tomcod, coalfish among other names.

American Pollock NH Community Seafood Selection of the Week

American Pollock
NH Community Seafood Selection of the Week

The boneless, skinless fillets arrived in excellent condition, firm, slightly gray flesh, with no off odors. With the exception of the hint of color, it would be easy to pass off as cod and once cooked I would defy a cod eater to tell the difference. I imagine this would be a great chowder fish or would take to the fryer very nicely. Opting for perhaps a healthier technique, I decided to broil the fish with a parsley pesto adapted from FISH by Mark Bittman.

The parsley pesto was very easy to make as it has only 4 basic ingredients plus salt and pepper to taste. Process a loosely packed cup of parsley leaves with most of the stems removed, garlic to taste (I have a heavy hand), a tablespoon of lemon juice, 1/3 to 1/2 Cup of extra virgin olive oil along with a dash of salt and pepper in your blender until the mixture is a finely pureed liquid. To cook: line a cookie sheet with tin foil and place a slight amount of the pesto under each fillet and then brush more pesto on top of the fish and broil for 6 to 8 minutes or until the flesh is white and easily breaks into scallops.

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